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Tube Feeding Tips: Granulation Tissue Build up

Many thanks to Laura Matarese, MS, RD, LD, FADA, CNSD, Manager, Nutrition Support Dietetics at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation for volunteering her professional opinion in response to the questions below.

 

Build up of Granulation Tissue

I also have a question regarding a continuous buildup of granulation tissue around the gastrostomy tube. I have had it cauterized with silver nitrate and surgically cut several times since I have had the tube, with no success. I have tried numerous antibiotic ointments, oral antibiotics, IV antibiotics and daily cautery after surgically being cut to prevent it from growing back. But nothing helps. It is chronically infected and irritated. The only other option suggested to me, was to have the tube removed to let it heal and reinsert it at a different site, but there is no guarantee that it will help. I would appreciate any feedback.

—Carol Pelissier
280 Elgin Ave.,
Manchester, NH 03104
(603) 625-2362


Unfortunately, granulation tissue is very common. It can occur when GI secretions leak up and around the outside of the tube. So making sure you have a “snug fitting” tube is important. Apart from this, there really is not much more that can be done except to continue to cauterize with silver nitrate. I am afraid that it is a problem that is likely to continue to reoccur. Carol is correct in stating that the tube can be resited, but there is no guarantee that granulation will not reoccur.

 

Painful Scar Tissue Around Stoma

I am looking for some help with painful scar tissue in my stoma. Apparently when I was first on enteral, my surgeon placed a Foley catheter and anchored it in a few places, stitching it to my stoma area. After two months, he took my Foley catheter and stitches out and put in a Mic-key, which I currently use as my J-tube. Nine months later, I now have three very painful raised scars which cause me to feel a sharp pain as the tube starts moving around. (Since I have a motility disorder, my tube moves around.) My dermatologist tried to shrink these scars by injecting them with Triamcinolone Acetonide ointment. I am going to try a pain clinic to see if they can anesthetize the nerves in my stoma. I am wondering if I would be better off if they just removed these scars?

—Cathy Tokarz
Bloomingdale, IL
healthyC@worldnet.att.net

Scars around J-tube sites are common, and unfortunately, there isn’t much more that can be done. Hollister has a clamp which can be used to anchor the tube and prevent it from moving around, which may help. I wish I had more to offer.

more Calendar

2/6/2017 » 2/10/2017
Feeding Tube Awareness Week

2/18/2017 » 2/21/2017
Oley exhibit at A.S.P.E.N.'s Clinical Nutrition Week

5/6/2017
Oley Regional Conference

This website is an educational resource. It is not intended to provide medical advice or recommend a course of treatment. You should discuss all issues, ideas, suggestions, etc. with your clinician prior to use. Clinicians in a relevant field have reviewed the medical information; however, the Oley Foundation does not guarantee the accuracy of the information presented, and is not liable if information is incorrect or incomplete. If you have questions please contact Oley staff.

 

Updated in 2015 with a generous grant from Shire, Inc. 

 

This website was updated in 2015 with a generous grant from Shire, Inc. This website is an educational resource. It is not intended to provide medical advice or recommend a course of treatment. You should discuss all issues, ideas, suggestions, etc. with your clinician prior to use. Clinicians in a relevant field have reviewed the medical information; however, the Oley Foundation does not guarantee the accuracy of the information presented, and is not liable if information is incorrect or incomplete. If you have questions please contact Oley staff.
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