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Answers to the 2002 HPEN Millionaire Quiz

Contestant #1: Suzanne Herbst, RN, MA

$100 Question:
C. 1969

$500 Question:
C. Triple lumen non-tunneled catheter

$1,000 Question:
C. Occlusions and infections, with inability to withdraw being the biggest problem.

$3,000 Question:
C. 40% non-thrombotic / 60% thrombotic

$6,000 Question:
D. Sluggish flow or poor blood return through the catheter, according to a survey by the National Association of Vascular Access Networks (NAVAN).

$15,000 Question:
D. All of the above.

$32,000 Question:
C. Intraluminal instillation of a thrombolytic agent. Many people ignore VAD problems, but they shouldn’t. Difficulty withdrawing indicates a problem that should be dealt with. Because removing/replacing catheters destroys vascular pathways, it is advisable keep lines in place whenever possible.

$64,000 Question:
C. Alteplase. Urokinase used to have FDA approval; however, a few years ago it was removed from the market. Streptokinase poses too great a risk of allergic reaction for routine use in patients, and heparin does not break up clots.

$125,000 Question:
D. All the above.

$250,000 Question:
D. All of the above.

$500,000 Question:
D. All of the above, though whenever possible it is best to try to treat the infection without removing the line.

$1,000,000 Question:
C. Peppermint Patty — Incorrect, better luck next game Suzanne!

Contestant #2: Sheila Messina, RN, MA

$100 Question:
D. Call your home care provider. You can do any of the things listed, but you’ll likely be educating them rather than yourself.

$500 Question:
A. Talk to your spouse. We all know there are no quiet pumps — despite what the manufacturers claim. They seem quiet, until you turn the lights off.

$1,000 Question:
C. Talk to your physician about reducing the volume. If you do not infuse, or take only part of your infusion, you’ll feel miserable the next day. Discuss your options with your physician. It’s not a black and white situation. There maybe special times when you can decrease the volume.

$3,000 Question:
A. Medications used to treat osteoporosis

$6,000 Question:
C. Call Oley and ask for help starting a group

$15,000 Question:
B. It is important to monitor your body’s response to HPN

$32,000 Question:
C. Carry an updated medical history with you — wherever you go. This way your needs can be met without wasting time. It can also save you should you be in a situation where you are unconscious or in too much pain to relate your medical history. (Editor’s note: for a FREE copy of Oley’s Travel/Hospital Packet which can help you record your medical history, visit our website at http://www.oley.org/pubs.html or call 800-776-OLEY.)

$64,000 Question:
C. Examines the pancreatic duct using a special endoscope

$125,000 Question:
B. Get a second opinion. There may be another physician with greater or different experience in treating your particular problem. Also, I would not recommend over the counter drugs; they could be very dangerous.

$250,000 Question:
B. You can contaminate the central line with material from the stoma.

$500,000 Question:
D. All of the above. As a nurse I can tell you that smiling uses fewer muscles than frowning, and that smiling really does help prevent wrinkles, but the biggest reason to smile, is it truly makes you feel better.

$1,000,000 Question:
A. Schroeder strawberry — Incorrect, better luck next game Sheila!


Contestant #3: Craig Peterson, RD, CNSD

$100 Question:
D. Over 1,000,000. It sounds incredibly high, but it’s true!

$500 Question:
C. In the hospital, when tube feedings are initiated. Receiving instruction while in a comfortable setting, without the added pressures of being on your own, is best. This is also a time when you can access available resources and professionals.

$1,000 Question:
B. Refrigerator temperature allows for the greatest rate of formula absorption and the most rapid stomach emptying. Lower initial formula temperature also retards the potential growth of any bacteria in the formula.

$3,000 Question:
D. Water. There are several studies which clearly indicate that water is the best liquid for flushing feeding tubes. Other liquids, such as cranberry juice or cola offer no additional benefits and since they are high in sugar, leave a coating of sugar on the wall of the tube.

$6,000 Question:
A. When the tube malfunctions. To minimize potential complications, don’t fix something that isn’t broken.

$15,000 Question:
C. Medications that aren’t crushed enough, and medications that interact with proteins in the formula, are the most common causes of problems. This is a good reason for flushing well with water after each infusion.

$32,000 Question:
B. Replace with a tube of the same French size immediately. Be sure you always have an alternate tube on hand to maintain the tract and preserve your enteral access.

$64,000 Question:
C. Maintain balloon at usual volume. There shouldn’t be a problem because the cabin is pressurized, and even if it weren’t, there wouldn’t be a significant expansion of the water in the balloon.

$125,000 Question:
A. There is no specific volume; tolerance is the best guide.

$250,000 Question:
C. The same concentration of particles as blood contains. Isotonic stems from the Latin root word iso meaning the same as.

$500,000 Question:
D. Reduce the nutrient content of the formula. Diluting isotonic solutions actually reduces stomach emptying and tolerance. Formulas are designed to be isotonic for increased tolerance and absorption.

$1,000,000 Question:
B. Charlie Brown chocolate — Incorrect, better luck next game Craig!


Contestant #4: Marvin Ament, MD

$100 Question:
D. Her doctor. There was no TPN nurse, home TPN pharmacist or home care nurse knowledgeable in HomePEN. The doctor was the only resource.

$500 Question:
D. 25 years old. She graduated from UCR and is currently a school teacher.

$1,000 Question:
D. 24 years and in all that time he hasn’t had a line infection with this catheter!

$3,000 Question:
A. 21 days old. This patient had gastroschisis with no other problems. With motivated parents and medical team this was a very successful discharge.

$6,000 Question:
D. By accident. Aluminum was a contaminant from different additives used in TPN. These accidental findings prompted several changes in the production of Total Parenteral Nutrition.

$15,000 Question:
C. Changes in hair color and texture. Since this discovery, Selenium levels are monitored more closely.

$32,000 Question:
B. 10 cm. The patient had an otherwise healthy gut, and consistent feedings from birth that ultimately prompted her gut to adapt. She is currently eating by mouth and has been thriving for more than 12 years.

$64,000 Question:
C. Sometimes. Somatostatin has been helpful for some, but doesn’t have a purpose for every SBS patient. The most benefits have been seen in patients with high ostomy output.

$125,000 Question:
B. Rub 1 tablespoon of safflower oil onto arms and legs each day. Essential fatty acids are required for only 2 percent of your daily calories.

$250,000 Question:
C. Maximizing early enteral feedings. Early use of the gut brings us closer to the goal of getting individuals off TPN.

$500,000 Question:
D. All of the above.

$1,000,000 Question:
D. Pigpen peanut butter — Congratulations!

more Calendar

2/6/2017 » 2/10/2017
Feeding Tube Awareness Week

2/18/2017 » 2/21/2017
Oley exhibit at A.S.P.E.N.'s Clinical Nutrition Week

This website is an educational resource. It is not intended to provide medical advice or recommend a course of treatment. You should discuss all issues, ideas, suggestions, etc. with your clinician prior to use. Clinicians in a relevant field have reviewed the medical information; however, the Oley Foundation does not guarantee the accuracy of the information presented, and is not liable if information is incorrect or incomplete. If you have questions please contact Oley staff.

 

Updated in 2015 with a generous grant from Shire, Inc. 

 

This website was updated in 2015 with a generous grant from Shire, Inc. This website is an educational resource. It is not intended to provide medical advice or recommend a course of treatment. You should discuss all issues, ideas, suggestions, etc. with your clinician prior to use. Clinicians in a relevant field have reviewed the medical information; however, the Oley Foundation does not guarantee the accuracy of the information presented, and is not liable if information is incorrect or incomplete. If you have questions please contact Oley staff.
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